Education

Tamil Nadu HSC results 2017: Results via SMS makes parents, students happy

Tamil Nadu HSC results 2017: Results via SMS makes parents, students happy

CHENNAI: Gone are the days where anxious students used to throng schools and brave the big crowds surrounding the notice board as they tried to see what marks they scored.CHENNAI: Il s’est passé les jours où les étudiants anxieux avaient l’habitude de forcer les écoles et de braver les grandes foules entourant le tableau d’affichage alors qu’ils essayaient de voir quelles marques ils marquaient.
L’introduction de la déclaration des résultats par SMS par le gouvernement Tamil Nadu a été accueillie par plusieurs parents qui ont estimé que c’était une expérience beaucoup plus facile pour leurs enfants.CHENNAI: Atrás quedaron los días en que los estudiantes ansiosos acostumbraban acudir a las escuelas y desafiar a las grandes multitudes que rodeaban el tablón de anuncios mientras trataban de ver qué calificaciones anotaron.CHENNAI: Había pasado los días en que los estudiantes anxieux avaient l’habitude de Forcer les écoles et de braver les grands foules autourant le tableau d’affichage alors qu’ils essayaient de voir quelles marques ils marquaient.CHENNAI: Gone are the days where anxious students used to throng schools and brave the big crowds surrounding the notice board as they tried to see what marks they scored.CHENNAI: Il s’est passé les jours où les étudiants anxieux avaient l’habitude de forcer les écoles et de braver les grandes foules entourant le tableau d’affichage alors qu’ils essayaient de voir quelles marques ils marquaient.
L’introduction de la déclaration des résultats par SMS par le gouvernement Tamil Nadu a été accueillie par plusieurs parents qui ont estimé que c’était une expérience beaucoup plus facile pour leurs enfants.CHENNAI: Atrás quedaron los días en que los estudiantes ansiosos acostumbraban acudir a las escuelas y desafiar a las grandes multitudes que rodeaban el tablón de anuncios mientras trataban de ver qué calificaciones anotaron.CHENNAI: Había pasado los días en que los estudiantes anxieux avaient l’habitude de Forcer les écoles et de braver les grands foules autourant le tableau d’affichage alors qu’ils essayaient de voir quelles marques ils marquaient.
La introducción de la declaración de los resultados por SMS por el gobierno Tamil Nadu un verano accueillie por varios padres que estimaron que era una experiencia mucho más fácil para sus niños.
Un momento dado, los periódicos de la noche en las ediciones de los resultados que se pueden ver en el medio.
Bien que los resultados son sorpresas pendientes de los años en la dirección de la educación escolar el mismo mañan,
La introducción de declarar los resultados a través de SMS por el gobierno de Tamil Nadu fue bienvenida por varios padres que sentían que era mucho más fácil para sus hijos.
En un momento dado, los periódicos nocturnos publicaban ediciones especiales para que los resultados pudieran publicarse al mediodía.
Aunque los resultados han sido liberados por años en la dirección de la educación de la escuela en la mañana sí mismo, uno tuvo que esperar las ediciones especiales para dar simplemente el número de registro de candidatos.
À un moment donné, les journaux du soir ont fait des éditions spéciales afin que les résultats puissent être publiés à midi.
Bien que les résultats aient été sortis pendant des années à la direction de l’éducation scolaire le matin même, il fallait attendre que les éditions spéciales ne donnent que le nombre d’inscription des candidats.
The introduction of declaring results through SMS by the Tamil Nadu government was welcomed by several parents who felt it was much easier experience for their kids.
At one point of time, evening newspapers ran special editions so that results could be published at noon.
Though results have for years been released at the school education directorate in the morning itself, one had to wait for the special editions to merely give the registration number of candidates.
La introducción de la declaración de los resultados por SMS por el gobierno Tamil Nadu un verano accueillie por varios padres que estimaron que era una experiencia mucho más fácil para sus niños.
Un momento dado, los periódicos de la noche en las ediciones de los resultados que se pueden ver en el medio.
Bien que los resultados son sorpresas pendientes de los años en la dirección de la educación escolar el mismo mañan,
La introducción de declarar los resultados a través de SMS por el gobierno de Tamil Nadu fue bienvenida por varios padres que sentían que era mucho más fácil para sus hijos.
En un momento dado, los periódicos nocturnos publicaban ediciones especiales para que los resultados pudieran publicarse al mediodía.
Aunque los resultados han sido liberados por años en la dirección de la educación de la escuela en la mañana sí mismo, uno tuvo que esperar las ediciones especiales para dar simplemente el número de registro de candidatos.
À un moment donné, les journaux du soir ont fait des éditions spéciales afin que les résultats puissent être publiés à midi.
Bien que les résultats aient été sort

2015^,* iV 1 ASSEMBLY POLLS BIHAR

He quips, moving towards others in the room. The post would appear soon on Facebook wall of many users in Bihar, asking them to ponder whether the Prime Minister was economical with the truth when he promised to bring back black money stashed in overseas bank accounts. In all likelihood, it will also prod them to ponder whether the scion has a message noteworthy enough to step into his father’s shoes.

Anu, an MBA graduate from Sikkim Manipal University, is the only woman among the six professionals hired by the RJD to run the war room
for Tej Pratap and younger brother Tejaswi at the three-acre farmhouse. In the last three months the six, led by IT professional Rakesh Kumar Singh, have already finished the first phase of their job—making an exhaustive database comprising every voter in Mahua and Raghopur. Those are the two assembly seats Tej Pratap says he and Tejaswi intend to contest in the assembly elections likely to be held in October or November.

“We have succeeded in connecting with the voters of the two constituen­cies,” Singh says. “If a person in any
of the two constituencies sends us a message about, say, a dysfunctional transformer, we first alert the offi­cial concerned and then connect Tej Pratap Sir with that person. The job is usually done in a day or two.”

Tej Pratap, say his team members, also intervenes whenever required. From sending RJD leaders to resolve disputes among neighbours to call­ing block-level officials for work such as issuing certificates or pensions, the political science graduate from

LALU PARIVAR IN POLLS

A look at RJD’s performance in assembly and Lok Sabha polls

2005

February Assembly Polls Single-largest party

Seats Wins Vote share 215              75             25.07%

Rabri Devi

wins from Raghopur

2005

October Assembly Polls Floored by JDU-BJP

Seats Wins Vote share 175              54             23.45%

Rabri Devi

retains

Raghopur

2009

Lok Sabha Polls Nosedive from 22 in ’04 Seats Wins Vote share 28 4               19.31%

Lalu Prasad

wins Saran seat

Lalu Prasad

loses in Patliputra

 

ASSEMBLY POLLS BIHAR

 

 

 

Patna’s B.N. College—incidentally the same college and the same course that had spawned another student leader called Lalu Prasad so many summers ago—tries to sort out such issues for the locals.

Having collated names of every voter—along with their caste profile, contact numbers and, as an adden­dum to Lalu’s tried-and-tested caste chemistry, Facebook details of those active on social media, the team regu­larly reaches out to these users, check­ing whether everything is all right in their locality, helping them connect with the two young Yadavs, and in between slipping in a subtle political message about how effective the siblings would be as their legislators. In his lat­est Facebook post, Tej Pratap in fact has sought public advice on how to regulate Bihar hos­tels better—an issue he wants to discuss with Chief Minister Nitish Kumar soon.

More than a decade after their father dismissed comput­ers as just another western fad which too will fade away with time, the brothers are investing a huge amount of their time and energy on the same technology to take Lalu’s empire forward.

R

JD insiders concede that when Lalu accepted Nitish Kumar as the chief ministerial candidate of the Janata Parivar coalition with Nitish’s Janata Dal (United), he informally declared the end of his era. For, this was the first time in 25 years since Lalu took over as the Bihar chief minister that he had agreed to project an outsider for the post. The irony being, Lalu has done it for his family—he agreed to look outside his family to establish his children in politics.

Barred from contesting elections since his conviction in a fodder scam case, having had a heart surgery last August, his party at an all-time low in terms of seats (see box) and dumped as a coalition partner by the Congress— at the behest of another scion, Rahul Gandhi—Lalu is fast running out of
options. Ahead of what is for him and his party a make-or-break elec­tion, he has pinned all hopes on Tej Pratap, Tejaswi and daughter Misa Bharti. While many of his colleagues have parted ways, some have been ousted—expelled Madhepura MP Pappu Yadav says, “Inheritance is fine in property and assets but can­not be allowed in politics”—and still others, bereft of options, have fallen in line on this issue of dynasty politics. In private, most senior RJD leaders are not happy at Lalu’s efforts to hand over the baton to one of his children.

But they dare not confront the chief­tain. Ergo they rally around the Next- Gen Yadavs.

Of the three, Misa, 38 years old and Lalu and Rabri’s first born, is known to be sharp, persuasive, politically ambi­tious and possessing the most mature and astute political brain among the siblings. Although she contested the Lok Sabha elections last summer from Patliputra, a seat her father also contested from in 2009, and lost, the gold-medallist MBBS and mother of two faced a crushing defeat. She lost to BJP’s Ram Kirpal Yadav by more than 40,000 votes. Ever since, she has
stayed below the radar—neither seen nor heard so far in the run-up to the assembly elections. Misa has not even indicated whether she will contest the elections, although it is speculated that she may spring a surprise on poll eve, better prepared than before.

At 5 feet and 8 inches, the mild- mannered Tejaswi comes across as a smoother, more suave version of his father. Unlike Lalu’s homespun man­nerism and carefully nurtured rus­tic charm, Tejaswi is urbane, speaks fluent English and weighs his words carefully. Also unlike his outspoken elder brother Tej Pratap, the commerce graduate who cap­tained the Delhi Public School, R.K. Puram, cricket team and was with the Delhi Daredevils IPL team for four seasons with­out getting a game, keeps his cards close to his chest. Like the eldest sister, he does not even say whether he is interested in contesting the polls, although Tej Pratap gives out the con­stituencies earmarked for the two brothers.

That leaves the elder brother to inherit the mantle. And Lalu too seems to have come to such a conclusion. An inch taller and a year-and-half older, Tej Pratap, the more accessible and straight- talking of the two, was initially thought to be his mother’s favou­rite while Tejaswi was seen as Lalu’s inheritor. However on April 5, when Lalu told his party’s national executive that only a son can succeed a father, the young man accepting greetings and garlands from youth wing members of the RJD was Tej Pratap.

For now, there’s no big, radical pic­ture they are projecting; the brothers are talking about the youth and trying to raise students issues. But whether those can pack enough horsepower to gather speed like their SUVs—Tej Pratap is often seen wheeling a Toyota Fortuner, while Tejaswi steers a Ford Endeavour—and win elections out­side college campuses is a story whose climax can be written only by a face­less crowd called the Bihar

By Amitabh Srivastava

Frame with the photograph of a uniformed Pervez Musha­rraf, shaking hands with a smiling, kurta-clad Lalu Prasad is gathering cobwebs on the wall of a small room at 10, Circular Road in Patna. On the picture is the former Pakistani president’s hand­written compliments to the former chief minister of Bihar—“To an art­ist of a politician, Laloo Saheb.” The sprawling bungalow in the state capi­tal’s uber-plush locality is allotted to Lalu’s wife Rabri Devi. Between them, the couple administered— many say ruled—Bihar for 15 years, starting in 1990.

It’s 11 a.m. on a particularly humid late June morning, and the “artist” has retired for a siesta at his baithak (meeting room). Having attended to some visitors since 8.30 a.m., Lalu, his hangers-on say, would rest for a cou­ple of hours. There’s little sign of any­one here ruling any place outside the bungalow—at least for now. The doors of the baithak are open, and the air conditioner’s wheezing noise sounds almost like the state of affairs Lalu’s once-powerful party, the Rashtriya Janata Dal (RJD), is in today.

The contrast could not have been sharper in another bungalow a few kilometres away in Danapur, on the western outskirts of Patna. There are a dozen computers and half-a-dozen
people in six cubicles are frenetical­ly punching away on the keyboards on the first-floor office space in Lalu Prasad’s farmhouse. This is the work­ing office of Tej Pratap Yadav, 27, the elder of Lalu’s two sons, who seems to be emerging as the chosen one to take up the mantle from his battle- weary father. Inside his “war room”, Tej Pratap smiles after reading out the text that Anu Pandey, 22, has juxta­posed with a picture of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. It reads: “When will I get my Rs 15 lakh you had promised on poll eve?”

Hands on waist, the grin widens. “Good work. Now post it through all our Facebook accounts, and don’t for­get tagging as many users as you can,”

 

ARMY OFFICERS SAY COLONEL SUJEET BANERJEE MADE SEVERAL FUTILE ATTEMPTS TO ALERT COLONEL M.K. CHAKRABORTY OF THE IRREGULARITIES.

army’s attempt to replace its 1990s vintage imagery interpretation sys­tems that one officer terms “junk”. The blocked procurement pipeline is believed to now include a requirement for over 40 such systems, a glaring capability gap that has been repeat­edly flagged by army commanders in internal conferences.

One reason being given for the Col’s slow progress is the fact that Lt General Thakur, Major General Asija simply refused to join the probe. This left the court with no option but to issue arrest warrants against them. The warrants are with the district magistrates in Gurgaon and Noida where the two officers live after their retirement. The officers have so far refused to respond to the Col which was reconvened on June 23. Army officers say a fresh set of arrest warrants will now be served on them.

PAST IMPERFECT This is not Rolta’s first brush with controversy. In an April 2015 report, a California-based capital markets research firm, Glaucus Research Group, noted that “preponderance of evidence suggests that the vast majority of Rolta’s reported capital expendi­tures have been fabricated”. The report was an assessment of $500 million of junk bonds issued in the US market by Rolta’s Delaware subsidiary between 2013 and 2014 which had attracted inves- »- tors by offering tempting yields.

The group said that the IT firm’s reported spending in India was “dis­appearing into phantom prototypes, mysterious construction projects and computer systems of questionable authenticity and utility”.

It also flagged the fact that an ongoing Ministry of Defence inquiry had been omitted from its bond pro­spectuses, “which in our view is a material omission because the scan­dal could jeopardise future contracts with the Indian government. These incidents are further evidence of the lack of transparency or accountability at Rolta. ” Rolta has contested Glaucus’ findings, terming them “baseless”,

 

riddled with “factual errors” and “inaccuracies”. It referred to news reports cited by Glaucus of the defence ministry inquiry as making no express allegation or conclusion against the company or its officials. Accordingly, it is just an attempt to falsely imply the company’s complicity and impact its reputation, Rolta claimed.

The Col has photographs that show Colonel Chakraborty, director MI-17 and Colonel Banerjee’s boss, on a private holiday with Rolta execu­tives in 2009. Colonel Chakraborty did not return calls for comment.

Preliminary findings of the army Col seem to agree with what the MI

MI-17 DIRECTOR COLONEL M.K. CHAKRABORTY WITH ROLTA EXECUTIVES ON A HOLIDAY IN THAILAND, IN 2009

 

whistleblowers had said in their writ­ten complaints since 2011. The Col established contractual and financial discrepancies in the annual mainte­nance contracts concluded with Rolta after December 2008. Original con­tracts with Intergraph and Bentley and other third party software updates and upgrades were not pro­vided by Rolta despite the mandate for the supplier in the original contract. Rolta merged the costs of hardware and software in 2008, making it diffi­cult for the army to work out the loss to the exchequer due to the denial of software upgrades, officials familiar

 

with the Col say.

Company officials, however, strongly denied these findings. “Rolta has been providing comprehensive maintenance services to the Indian Army for two decades now and army users are completely satisfied with these services. There are no con­tractual and financial discrepancies in any annual maintenance contract with Rolta. In fact, army users have issued hundreds of letters appreciat­ing Rolta support services,” a compa­ny spokesperson said.

Rolta refutes it had withheld any deliverable that had been contracted for, a constant charge made by sever­al army whistleblowers. “Rolta provides comprehensive main­tenance services for integrated systems, as contracted,” the spokesperson told india today in a written response. “Rolta has met and exceeded all its contractual commitments, including supply of all software updates and upgrades. We categorically deny that Rolta has withheld or not provided any deliverable that has been contracted for.”

Responding to charges that it had pushed its software onto the Indian Army in the absence of competition from other soft­ware developers, the company spokesperson said that Rolta had followed due process in obtaining all required sanctions, its software had been tested by army users before induction by conducting an extensive pre­dispatch inspection and a joint receipt inspection, as per contractual provi­sions. “This software has been in sus­tained use at army formations for the last six-plus years and the company has received numerous appreciation letters from army user sites all over the country, which stand testimony to the quality of Rolta software and sup­port services.”

As the court of inquiry hurtles towards a long-awaited conclu­sion, the embattled whistleblowers in Military Intelligence hope to have proved them wrong.

THE BIG STORY ROLTA CASE FILES

Repeated warning signs were ignored by top army officers until 2011 when a probe was ordered

Whistleblower in MI-17 reports irregularities in equip­ment supplied by Rolta. The Rs 165-crore contract with the army is put on hold.

Ml finds grounds for a Col,
but Director General, Ml, Lt
General B.S.Thakur does not
order it. Three whistleblowers
posted out of the directorate.

  • co Army orders a Col after | o yet another Ml officer com- I >, plains in writing to then army 3 chief Bikram Singh. Army constitutes a Col into Rolta procurement and AMCs.
  • g Colonel Sujeet Banerjee found dead in room a day before he is to j r§ depose before Col.

Col issues arrest warrants for Lt General B.S.Thakur and Major General D.N. Asijafor not deposing.

ROLTA SAYS IT IS
NOT AN ACCUSED
IN THE ARMY Col,

IT DENIES CONTRAC-
TUALAND FINANCIAL
DISCREPANCIES
IN ANNUAL
MAINTENANCE
CONTRACTS.

 

Intergraph and Bentley—and sup­plied to the army by Rolta.

Over 70 such systems were pur­chased for the Indian Army and dis­tributed amongst specially created Imagery Interpretation feams (IITs) of the army among divisions, corps and commands to interpret satel­lite imagery and pass it on to tactical formations.

The firm, however, did not offer ‘software upgrades and updates’ as mentioned in the 1996 contract. From 2008, the annual maintenance contracts were reworded only to include the word ‘updates’. Colonel Banerjee suspected this was the case because the firm did not own the original software.

In 2009, the army had initiated the purchase of a fresh batch of GI systems to replace the older ones bought in 1998. It, however, insisted that the systems not be floated as a global tender and be purchased as a repeat order from Rolta. This meant that it would not have to follow the normal procedures of a fresh con­tract. The army insisted on single­vendor procurement despite the Defence Acquisition Council suggest­ing otherwise in 2010.

An MoD Cost Negotiation Committee noted that the company had now stamped its name on all the products. This was a marked change from a 2004 contract where Rolta was only the distributor for US-supplied software. Army officials say Colonel Banerjee made several futile attempts to alert Colonel M.K Chakraborty of the irregularities. In March 2011, Colonel Banerjee finally complained against Colonel Chakraborty to his seniors in the MI directorate. His superior officers Major General Asija, the then additional director general, MI (B) and Brigadier R. Chibber, addi­tional director general in-charge of technical equipment in the MI, rec­ommended a Col. The two officers had by then carried out extensive investigations with all the officers of MI-17 about the dubious software upgrades to establish that there were indeed grounds for a formal Col.

The whiff of a scandal would have immediately led to an inquiry,
particularly as it was flagged by two senior MI officers who put their com­plaint down in writing. However, the DGMI Lt General Thakur did not order a probe. What he did next only piqued the interest of the offi­cials handling the current inquiry. In August 2011, Lt General Thakur verbally asked the Military Secretary’s branch to post three officers out of the Directorate of MI—the whistle­blower Colonel Banerjee, Brigadier Chibber and a third officer in MI-17, Lt Colonel Sandeep Ahlawat, who had red-flagged the aberrations. All three officers were posted out of the directorate one month apart and sent to inconsequential appointments outside Delhi. Colonel Banerjee was posted to the Army Welfare Housing Organisation, a career dead-end. The matter seemed buried.

Rolta’s sale of a Rs 165-crore contract for purchasing sensitive spy imaging systems cleared in 2010 did not go through.

DEATH AND RESURRECTION In January 2013, another military intelligence officer detected anom­alies in the Rolta contracts. Major Shubda Naik, an intelligence corps officer posted in MI-17, wrote to then army chief General Bikram Singh about the discrepancies. On July 29, 2013, the army ordered a Col headed by Brigadier Ashwani Kumar. The key witness for the prosecution was going to be the original whistleblow­er, Colonel Banerjee. This was when matters took another curious turn. On January 26, 2014, just a day before he was to depose before the Board of Inquiry, Colonel Banerjee was found dead in his room in the United Services Institution (USI) in south Delhi.

A post-mortem revealed the cause of death to be heart attack. The inquiry was hobbled by his absence but continued as the court examined other officials who had pointed out irregularities. The Col is now over two years old. Unusual because army COIs don’t last more than six months. But then, few cases in the army have seen not one but three whistleblow­ers stand up and report irregularities. The delayed probe has stalled the

ARMY SPOOKS UNDERTHESCANNER An army probe issues arrest warrants for two generals as it discovers discrepancies in a deal with a private firm. Result: No procurement of sensitive spying equipment.

 

By Sandeep Unnithan

Intelligence for refusing to join a two- year-old probe into irregularities in military intelligence procurements.n ongoing army investigation has revealed the complicity of army officials and irregulari­ties in a contract with a private sector software firm. The inquiry took a dramatic turn on June 5 this year, when a military court issued arrest warrants for former director general of military intelligence Lt General B.S. Thakur and Major General D.N. Asija (retired) of the Directorate of Military

The probe has simmered with­in the army for over two years. The army ordered a Court of Inquiry (Col) in 2013 after military intelligence offi­cials complained about irregularities in the procurement of satellite inter­pretation equipment from a Mumbai- based private sector software firm, Rolta India Limited.

The Ministry of Defence has placed
on hold a Rs 165-crore contract with Rolta to supply 27 Photogrammetry and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the army because of these complaints. The contract was to have been signed in 2011 but was stalled after the controversy broke out that year. The slow-moving probe has paralysed the army’s procurement of newer GI systems critical for process­ing spy imagery, say army officials. The

A ROLTA DISPLAY STALL AT THE DEFEXPO 2012 IN NEW DELHI


THE SLOW-MOVING PROBE HAS PARALYSED THE INDIAN ARMY’S

PROCUREMENT OF EQUIPMENT CRITICAL TO PROCESS SPY IMAGERY.

mmm
The Col is looking into charges of irregularities in a Rs 165-crore deal for 27 spy satellite processing systems for military intelligence


army’s requirement for the systems is meanwhile mounting as old systems are in need of replacement.

Major General Asija’s refusal to join the probe, however, is curious given that he was one of the officers who recommended an inquiry in 2011. The inquiry conducted in Sena Bhawan by a brigadier-ranked offi­cer has, so far, established close links between the Directorate of Military Intelligence (MI) and Rolta.

The Col has not established any financial wrongdoing because the contract did not go through. It has, however, found certain procedural deviations where the Directorate of MI insisted, reportedly on specious grounds, that procuring systems from new vendors would create problems of interoperability and integration.

Lt General Thakur, who was DGMI between 2011 and 2013, let irregular­ities prevail in the directorate, army officials told india today. Lt General Thakur and Major General Asija did not return calls or messages seeking comment. Responding to a question­naire from india today, a Rolta spokes­person clarified that the company was not an accused in the army Col. The company strongly denied contractual and financial discrepancies in annual maintenance contracts and denied holding back contractual obliga­tions. “Rolta provides comprehensive maintenance services for integrated systems, as contracted,” said M.K.

 

Govind, senior divisional director, corporate marketing and sales, Rolta India Limited.

THE WHISTLEBLOWING SPOOK The controversy began in 2011 when a whistleblower in the MI directorate

IN THE DOCK

LTGEN B.S. THAKUR

Was direc­tor general military intelli­gence between 2011-2013 when the irregularities came to light. Served arrest warrant for not joining inquiry.

MAJOR GENERAL D.N. ASIJA

Was ADG military intel­ligence under Lt Gen Thakur, but one of the officers who ordered a probe. Served arrest warrant for not joining the inquiry.

detected irregularities in a Rs 165- crore contract for purchasing 27 mobile and static photogrammetry and GIS systems. The systems—for command and truck-mounted units for mobile formations—are used to create three-dimensional imag­es of ground data collected from spy satellites, drones and aircraft. These 3D images are laid over GIS software to create a digital library of military targets.

The case came to light quite by accident. Colonel Sujeet Banerjee was posted as officiating director of the Mi’s sensitive 17th directorate (MI-17) that dealt exclusively with spy imagery. He was a stand-in for Colonel M.K. Chakraborty who was away on a month’s leave. The directorate is the nodal agency for processing satellite photographs from various commands and sends it down to various army formations. MI-17 also receives spy imagery from the National Technical Research Organisation (NTRO) and the Defence Image Processing and Analysis Centre (DIPAC) within the Defence Intelligence Agency.

A majority of these imagery tasks were carried out by systems the army had procured for over Rs 500 crore from Rolta between 1996 and 2008. Colonel Banerjee found discrepancies in the annual maintenance contracts the army had signed with the firm. The software had been purchased from three foreign firms—Oracle,